Senior Golfers More Likely to be Injured

Senior Golfers More Likely to be Injured

Senior golf does have advantages and some disadvantages. The most common disadvantage is the injury rate. Seniors over 50 have more chance of injury than a golfer who is younger. To understand and treat your injury is important. Preventing an injury is even more important. Sometimes no matter how careful you are, you can easily injure yourself. The most common injury is tendonitis of the wrist as well as the hamate fracture. Back and ankle injuries are also seen with senior golfers. Prevention is the key to a successful season of golf. Sometimes preventing the hamate fracture condition is not easy. The symptoms of a hamate fracture are pain around the wrist area and the heel of the hand. You might also have no feeling in your fingers, particularly the little finger. Often even an x-ray will not reveal a hamate fracture – instead an expensive MRI scan may be needed.  Early detection is crucial for a senior golfer. If it is left untreated, it will hinder your performance on the course and develop into intolerable pain. If you think you have a hamate fracture, you should see a doctor for treatment. This often involves a simple surgical procedure which works better than just simply immobilizing the wrist. You can prevent a wrist problem by changing the way you grip and hold your club. A different club design and style may also help. If you have a tight hold on the golf club, you are more prone to a hamate fracture. Adjusting your grip will help prevent both hamate fractures and tendonitis. Senior golf does also affect your whole...

Golf and osteoporosis

A lot of golfers, both men and women, ask themselves about the effects of playing golf on osteoporosis. If you don’t already know – though I’m sure you’ll have heard of it – osteoporosis (a word derived from the Greek for hollow bones) is a degenerative condition where the holes in your bones become larger, filling with bone marrow or fat. This decreases the bone density and, as a result, the bones become weak and break easily. One in every two women and one in every five men over the age of 50 will suffer a fracture as a result of weak bones. Can golf help prevent osteoporosis? The true causes of osteoporosis are still a bit of a mystery. However, it appears that exercise such as playing golf can help prevent the disease. As you play the game and walk round the course (ditch the cart!) you are supporting your body weight which helps bones renew. It also increases muscle strength which helps avoid falls – one of the major causes of broken bones in later years. Playing golf outside in the summer months also helps boost your vitamin D levels through exposure to daylight. This helps your body absorb calcium better, keeping your bones stronger. I have osteoporosis – can I still play golf? If you’ve been diagnosed with the disease you should ask the GP/Physician for advice. You may need to be more careful when you play and your medical advisors will let you know your personal limits. You should almost certainly use a motorised golf bag, for example. Golf requires significant twisting of the torso....

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